You are here

EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 14 hours ago

    Research has demonstrated that science benefits from diversity, but graduate programs still suffer from a lack of diversity, including in terms of race/ethnicity and the type of undergraduate institutions of applicants. Meanwhile, minority-serving institutions are full of students who are talented and passionate about science. Faculty members at these institutions are dedicated to their students and work to connect them with opportunities. But, at the same time, those faculty members are often overextended (unfortunately, minority serving institutions tend to be underresourced) and simply do not have the time to mentor all of their promising students through the process of applying to graduate schools and fellowship programs, including the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship. Moreover, most...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 day ago

    Note from Jeremy : this is a guest post by Abe Miller-Rushing and Richard B. Primack. Richard was Abe’s PhD advisor, and they continue to collaborate on many projects.

    **********************

    ... Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago

    It’s an annual tradition: ask us anything! Got a question about ecology, academia, or anything else we blog about? Ask in the comments! We’ll compile the questions and answer them in future posts.

    Past questions have ranged from how to be an ally, to what statistical methods ecologists need to know, to when to accept a “starter” job, to how we’d fix the entire US scientific funding system, to our worst moments in science. So ask away!

    UPDATE: This AUA is now closed, we have all the questions we can handle. Thank you to everyone who asked a question, look for our answers in upcoming posts.


    Filed under: Advice, Announcements and events,... Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    I recently read Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip Tetlock and Dan Gardner. Here’s my review.

    tl;dr: It’s good, and will get you thinking about how its conclusions apply to your own scientific work.

    Philip Tetlock studies decision-making by individuals and organizations. His co-author Dan Gardner is a noted journalist and popular science writer. The book is written in the first person, as if Tetlock were the sole author, so I assume Gardner was brought on board to polish the writing. Superforecasting is a popular account of the results of Tetlock’s decades of work organizing forecasting tournaments. Hundreds of participants were asked to predict the answers to hundreds of questions about future events. Those events were...

    Read the full article.
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    I am pretty much through with revisions to my manuscript on authorship, with one exception. One of the reviewers is (quite reasonably) pushing me to make a stronger recommendation about how authorship decisions should be made in the increasingly common case of collaborations between groups. But, of course, this is a tricky issue, and I’m waffling on what exactly to recommend. This blog post is me trying to work through that, and looking for feedback at the end. I’m quite interested in hearing how others think decisions about authorship should be made when multiple groups collaborate substantially on a project!

    I’ll start by recapping some of what my results, since they set up the general question. Then, I’ll give some of my thoughts on what might be a proposed solution. And, as I said above, I’ll end by asking for feedback on what I propose.

    My manuscript is interested in who is last and corresponding author as well as in the factors that influence peoples’...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    It’s faculty job hunting season, so I’m reupping Meghan’s very useful, recently-updated compilation of links related to tenure-track job searches in ecology.

    As an aside, you might also be interested in our series of posts on non-academic careers for ecologists. Starts here.


    Filed under: Advice, Jobs ... Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Reupping this from back in the spring:

    Last fall, I compiled data on the gender balance of over 170 newly-hired assistant professors of ecology and allied fields at N. American colleges and universities. The results were good news: 53% of N. American tenure-track assistant professors of ecology hired in 2015-16 (or in a few cases in 2014) were women.

    This year I’m doing it again. To make it easier, I’m asking for your help. This Google Docs spreadsheet lists all tenure-track positions in ecology and allied fields (plus a bunch of other positions) advertised in the 2016-17 job season. If you know who was hired to fill one or more of the listed N. American assistant professor positions in ecology or an...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    From Jeremy:

    The NSF has a new report on the career plans of newly-minted science and engineering PhDs. There are more than ever–but fewer have concrete plans for after they receive their degrees. (ht Chris Blattman)

    The opposite of a biologist is a model (the fashion kind, not the mathematical kind). (ht @matt_levine)

    Um…

    And finally: Meghan, Brian, and I celebrated Dynamic Ecology’s 5th birthday this week:

    We're out for dinner celebrating 5 years of...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    Later this week Brian will provide a bunch of tips on where to eat and drink in Portland, including several brewpubs. Commenters on our Portland open thread also have great tips. But if you’re a beer geek like me, you’re not going to be happy drinking at whichever decent bar is closest to the convention center. I’d rather go a bit further afield to seek out someplace really good and hopefully also less crowded. So here are the fruits of my background research on beer geek websites like RateBeer, plus a bit of personal experience from the last time ESA was in Portland, plus the...

    Read the full article.
  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 weeks ago

    I have been musing a lot lately, motivated in part by the post-fact era we seem to have moved to, on what makes science such a powerful way of knowing. Hopefully, my thinking will advance enough that I can write a post on that soon. The one thing I’m sure of is it is not the conventional answer of “we have the scientific method”. But in the mean time, I served on a criminal jury not too long ago. It got me thinking about how the criminal trail process and science were and were not similar. This seems like at least a good starting point to think about what makes science a powerful way of knowing.

    Although I am not legally barred from discussing my experience, probably better not to say too much specific. In general I was on the jury for a case involving OUI (operating a vehicle under the influence – a car and alcohol in this case). It was a very typical trial in the Anglo-Saxon legal system (I am aware many other countries have very different...

    Read the full article.

Pages

Powered by Drupal | Theme modified by Naupaka Zimmerman from Danland by Danetsoft | | INNGE is supported through a collaboration with INTECOL