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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 weeks ago
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
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    2 months 2 weeks ago
    Executive Editor, Marc Cadotte shares his thoughts on Jennifer Firn and colleagues’ new article, Integrating local knowledge and research to refine the management of an invasive non-native grass in critically endangered grassy woodlands and why utilising local knowledge is vital if we’re to provide successful solutions to environmental issues.  While many hurdles hamper the successful application […] Read the full article.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 weeks ago
  • via Dafna Gilad from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 weeks ago

    Only about a third of New Zealanders are concerned about their country’s species, while most of the public believes that native animals and plants are in a good state.

    In a way, it does make sense to think that New Zealand’s biodiversity is doing well. The country has a rich conservation history, a dedicated Department of Conservation and a constant increase in numbers of conservation NGOs and community projects.

    But, well… to be honest, our biodiversity state isn’t doing THAT well. Or rather, not so good at all.

    New Zealand is actually rated as the...

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  • via ebach from Beneath Our Feet: the GSBI Blog
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    2 months 2 weeks ago
    By Ciro Gardi, Scientific Officer, Animal & Plant Health Unit, European Food Safety Authority, Parma, Italy

     

    We are aware, especially the readers of this blog, of the immeasurable value of soil and of its unique and essential role. The focus of the Global Soil Biodiversity Initiative is the variety of living forms that soil can host, and it is clear that in order to have soil biodiversity we need to have soil. In other words, we will not be able to protect soil biodiversity if we are not protecting the soil as whole. Unfortunately, there are several processes leading to soil degradation and the intensity and combination of them vary across the globe.

    One of the most irreversible process, often overlooked, is represented by soil sealing, consequent the expansion of urban and industrial areas or the construction of transport infrastructures. The intensity of this process can be extremely high, especially in...

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  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
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    2 months 2 weeks ago
    Careers are odd things. The most important moments in your career might be purely serendipitous, causing you to owe the next 40 or 50 years of your life to being in the right place at the right time with the … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
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    2 months 2 weeks ago

    Leaving the European Union means leaving the Common Agricultural Policy, and the opportunity to develop a new UK agri-environment policy that delivers for the environment and people, based on the principle of ‘public money for public goods’.

    The Conservatives’ manifesto promised to work with farmers, food producers and environmental experts, and the devolved administrations to devise a new-agri environment system during this Parliament, and the Queen’s Speech confirmed that a new Agriculture Bill will soon be introduced.

    It is crucial that forthcoming decisions on agri-environment policy are informed by the best ecological evidence  While this is a devolved issue, with different priorities across the UK, the role of evidence will be important everywhere.

    Our Brexit Policy Working Group would like help from BES members in gathering evidence on the positive and negative impacts of existing agri-environment schemes to support a BES policy brief...

    Read the full article.
  • via Kirsty Lucas from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
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    2 months 2 weeks ago

    The little Australian marsupials, Bettongia leseuer, were once widespread across Australia but are now only found on off-shore islands or in fenced reserves, mainly due to predation by introduced feral cats and red foxes.

    The new findings, by a UNSW-led team of scientists, could assist in their successful reintroduction back onto the mainland.

    “Australian native species have not evolved with cats and foxes and so have not learnt the behaviours that can help them avoid being killed,” says study senior author and UNSW scientist Dr Katherine Moseby.

    “This prey naivety is thought to be the reason why most efforts to reintroduce threatened species outside fenced reserves and islands fail.”

    “The idea for our study came from facing the reality that we are unlikely to ever completely eradicate cats and foxes from...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
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    2 months 2 weeks ago
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
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    2 months 2 weeks ago

    Patriotism is defined as “having or showing great love and support for your country.” This Fourth of July, American bloggers Stephanie Schuttler and Emily Puckett show how supporting science reflects great love and support for the United States of America and is a democratic process in and of itself.

    1. Science inspires. Scientific and technological innovations made it possible to put a man on the moon and explore the depths of the ocean.  These events are an inspiration to the public and motivate scientists to keep pushing the limits of what is possible. These achievements, like Olympic medals, are worn with great pride by citizens and scientists alike. Mars, here we come.
    2. Science stimulates the ECONOMY. Stronger research programs mean more STEM jobs, which ultimately makes the United States competitive in global markets. Research-based businesses (think biotech, aerotech, or medical research) and universities create...
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