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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
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    3 weeks 4 days ago

    I’ve already done 2017 by the numbers, and inspired by Auriel Fournier, here are some goals for 2018, in no particular order…

     

    Get two long-languishing papers submitted. One is from my postdoc (and formed a pretty bit part of it), and the other is a long-standing collaboration that just needs some dedicated attention. I’m reminded of this lovely cartoon.

    ...

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  • via EcoEvo@TCD from EcoEvo@TCD
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    3 weeks 4 days ago

    As the year draws to a close, we thought we’d reflect on a some of our favourite scientific papers from 2017. There were only five entrants this year, but representing a broad range of work from across ecology and evolution, as chosen by PhD students and postdoctoral researchers from the School of Natural Sciences. So, without further ado, here are the papers from 2017 being entered into the EcoEvo hall of fame:

    ...

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  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
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    3 weeks 4 days ago

    Anna
    My favourite paper of 2017 was “Devil Tools & Tech: A Synergy of Conservation Research and Management Practice” (open access). This provides a great example of how to effectively bridge the “research-implementation gap” in conservation management. Instead of what could be called the “traditional model”, where scientists conduct and publish research, and only then engage with practitioners and policy makers, this paper provides a framework for integrating research and management questions into a scientific program from the start. The example provided is the management of the remaining wild and captive populations of the Tasmanian devil, which has been threatened in recent decades by devil facial tumour disease. I know of a few other programs that have adopted similar principles in the past, but it is great to see an accessible...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
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    3 weeks 4 days ago

    A few links for your holiday reading pleasure.

    From Jeremy:

    Conservation easements as a tax dodge for the wealthy. It seems the main issue is that the size of the tax write-off for granting one particular type of easement depends on rather arbitrary claims about how much the land would’ve been worth had it been developed. I know little of the issues here; discuss.

    A Darwinian theory of narrative fiction. I haven’t read it, but it looks interesting. (ht Brad DeLong).


    Filed under: Uncategorized... Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
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    3 weeks 4 days ago
    15908792958_d35dcd5aa6_b

    Water outflows from Fewston Reservoir, UK. Image: James Whitesmith | Flickr Creative Commons

    As the end of the year approaches, we’ve looked back over 2017 to collect 17 of our most popular posts on freshwater science, policy and conservation.

    It’s been the most successful year yet for the Freshwater Blog, with record numbers of visitors. Thanks, as always, for reading. You can keep up to date with our posts, and add your voice to the debate, through our Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

    The MARS project, which has investigated the interactions and impacts of multiple stressors on aquatic...

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  • via James_Borrell from James Borrell
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    3 weeks 4 days ago

    What lessons does driving across Africa teach you? Humility; check. Patience; check. But most importantly; that pre-conceptions are almost always wrong.

    Beginning this journey I was most nervous about Zimbabwe. We’d heard horror stories of police, bribes and corruption. Aside from the odd officer trying to boost his pay packet (after all, they’re chronically poorly paid), it turned out to be one of our favorite countries. The variety of habitats within its borders is spectacular. Six months later, it has even shaken itself free of Mugabe’s clutches. I can’t wait to see it blossom.

    Turn then to Mozambique. As we trundled down Tanzania I was nervous. Were we being brave or foolhardy in trying...

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  • from Next Succession
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    3 weeks 4 days ago


    Contents
    Part 1. Semi-arid/Scrub*          -Trees        -Shrubs and other plants        -Non-NativesPart 2. Temperate Forest*        -Trees        -Shrubs and other plants        -Non-Natives
    Click any image to enlarge.  Use ctrl+f to search trees by name.Trees and info to be added as I travel through... Read the full article.
  • via Lachlan Fetterplace from fish thinkers
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    3 weeks 4 days ago
    Fish Thinkers has just become an official project supporter of Australasian fishes, which as someone that has a slight obsession with fish, I am rather happy about.  Set up by the Australian Museum in 2016, it is a really nice example of a citizen science project that is open to all and it is getting lots of […] Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 5 days ago
        It's a tradition here at Living Alongside Wildlife to gather in one place a summary of all the animals that went extinct in the previous year. Click here for the 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2012 editions. Let's get into it. Stichocotyle nephropis, a marine parasite of Scotland last seen in 1986, may be extinct due to overfishing of its fish hosts, writes John Platt over at The Revelator.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 5 days ago

    Read previous years’ By the Numbers: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013

     

    12

    The number of new posts this year. Definitely a low, but some classics remain popular. The top 10:

    1. Personal academic websites for faculty & grad students: the why, what, and how
    2. How did we learn that birds migrate (and not to the moon)? A stab in the dark
    3. ...
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