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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via ibartomeus from Marginally significant
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 5 days ago

    I have to admit I didn’t know much about Marie Curie a few days ago (other than the “trivia” facts such as that she discovered the radioactivity and was the first women winner of a Nobel prize). But I just read a book* about her and I really loved it. Oh my god, she was unique in a thousand ways. The book is written by Rosa Montero, and uses Marie Curie’s diary written after Pierre Curie death to talk about very personal things including death, gender balance, society pressures, self-esteem, and many other main topics in life. So it’s not a typical biography, but an excuse to reflect on important things. I won’t go into details, but I highly recommend it.

    And while reading the book I found a quote by Pierre Curie that reflects at perfection my actual feeling in science.

    “Besides, we must make a living, and this...

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  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 5 days ago
    A few years ago, I wrote an article for Ensia about how popular media tend to separate science and nature stories as if they’re unrelated categories. Most major online news websites have separate pages for ‘Science’ stories (predominantly technology, space… Read the full article.
  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 5 days ago
    John Krapek (University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Brian Buma (University of Alaska Southeast) recently had a paper published in Journal of Ecology entitled ‘Limited stand expansion by a long-lived conifer at a leading northern range edge, despite available habitat‘. John tells us more about the paper below. Yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis, Cupressaceae), a culturally and economically important… Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 6 days ago
    As I have done for the last four years (2016, 2015, 2014, 2013), here’s another retrospective list of the top 20 influential conservation papers of 2017 as assessed by experts in F1000 Prime. More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas — … document[s] the devastating loss of flying insects […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Charles Krebs from Ecological Rants
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 weeks 6 days ago
    The end of another year in retirement and time to clean up the office. So this week I recycled 15,000 reprints – my personal library of scientific papers. I would guess that many young scientists would wonder why anyone would have 15,000 paper reprints when you could have all that on a small memory stick. […] Read the full article.
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    4 weeks 1 day ago
    Happy Holidays, Everyone! I already spread some parasite love this season by giving Parasite Rex and a mistletoe ornament as a white elephant gift, but I feel like I have even more to give. So here’s my first and best … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
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    1 month 10 hours ago

    It’s hard to visualise Darwin in swimming trunks. In fact we are so used to seeing a very old Darwin looking all stately that it’s hard to image him doing anything normal. Darwin was a real family man and spent a lot of time with his children. I imagine that on hot summer days he was tempted to slip away from the barnacles, manuscripts and pigeons and head off for a dip. There was no airconditioning then! I...

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  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
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    1 month 1 day ago

    The latest summary of amusing search terms (and some often facetious answers) that brought people to The Lab and Field in 2017. Find previous iterations here.

     

    Who are scientists

    We all are!

     

    how do people learn about migratory birds

    Blog posts, ornithology classes, naturalist societies, spear-throwing competitions…

     

    data error in published paper

    *clutches pearls* SURELY NOT!. Eh, it happens. Most of the time it’s not intentional.

     

    easy scientific names for lab

    Repetition is nice. Puffinus puffinus, Gorilla gorilla, Crex crex. You get the idea.

     

    how to host any sceince confrence

    ANY science conference? I...

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  • via PierreMariotte from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago
    The joint conference of the Ecological Society of Australia and the New Zealand Ecological Society was held just three weeks ago in Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia, as advertised in our previous post (read here). Organized every four years, this joint conference aims at bringing together ecologists from throughout Australasia and beyond. The theme of… Read the full article.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 2 days ago

    Anna

    I started a new job in January 2017, moving from a research-focused postdoc to a role with a mix of research and project management, coordinating the Oz Mammals Genomics Initiative. Getting stuck into this has given me less time to spend writing papers (and blogs…) than in previous years, so I’m pretty happy to have three papers with 2017 publication dates.

    I was very excited to see my PhD student Elodie Modave’s first paper: “A single mini-barcode test to screen for Australian mammalian predators from environmental samples”, published in GigaScience. Elodie developed a DNA test that can be used in barcoding / metabarcoding studies to distinguish all of the larger Australian mammal predators. In previous work, we’ve screened scat DNA to detect introduced (fox,...

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