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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 days ago

    As an early career academic I spend a lot of time contemplating how to make my research ‘count’. I know that I can – and should – write press releases for newly-published research to improve accessibility and reach for example. But what then? I know that I can write a policy brief, but who should I send it to, and will it be useful?

    I realised I needed to learn more about the audience who may potentially use my research to make decisions: what do they need, what barriers are there to effective communication, what can I do as a scientist to help their decision-making? I decided the best way to do this was to get ‘behind the scenes’ of policymaking, and gratefully accepted the opportunity to shadow...

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  • via Bob O'H from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 days ago
    Last week many of us were at the Ecology Across Borders meeting in Ghent, catching up with friends, making new friends, and listening to talks about the latest ecological science. Many of us, of course, were also following social media. … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 3 days ago
    Welsh stream

    A Welsh stream. Image: Kev Lewis | Flickr Creative Commons

    Human activities are altering freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity across the world at an unprecedented rate. However, predicting how freshwater species populations are affected by multiple stressors is often difficult, as a result of the complex and interactive ecological processes such as trophic links, competition and mutualism that take place across an ecosystem.

    In turn, changes in species composition can have unexpected or emergent effects on ecosystem processes and dynamics. For...

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  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    Note from Brian: This is a guest post from Thiago Silva a professor in the Geography department of São Paulo State University (UNESP), in Rio Claro, Brazil. A while back we had an ask us anything question on perceptions of ecology coming out of developing countries. This post stimulated a lot of discussion and it was suggested to solicit some first person experiences. This post is currently the last post on this topic (for a while at least). There have been a lot of common themes but also a lot of diverse perspectives. I encourage you to read them all!

    So I had about 2400 words written about “Doing Ecology in Brazil”, after receiving Brian’s invitation to write this guest post (Thanks!). And I went on and on detailing the problems with funding, infrastructure, bureaucracy, and so on. Some of it echoed...

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  • via Camilla Morrison-Bell from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago

    We heard from several groups, including People Need NaturePlantlife, The Land Workers’ Alliance, The Landscape Institute, the Country Land & Business Association and ADAS

    Speakers from these organisations presented their visions for how agriculture could be transformed in a post-Brexit landscape.

    A number of options were tabled and several themes had support across the board. The need for reform of payments to prioritise public benefit (and clear communication of what public benefit means to farmers and the general public) was one. However, opinions varied on how this could be delivered. It was emphasised that environmental goals need to be taken as seriously in farming as animal welfare now...

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  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago
    The cultural traditions of Christmas, like every aspect of our lives, are embedded in stories of science…botany, ecology, chemistry, entomology etc. If you blog about science and nature, Christmas-themed posts can easily become an annual habit. Unfortunately, because of our… Read the full article.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 4 days ago
    Corals could have some unexpected allies to cope with the multi-faceted threats posed by climate change. In a new study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Montano and colleagues show how tiny hydrozoans smaller than 1 mm and commonly found in dense colonies on the surface of hard corals (see above photo) […] ... Read the full article.
  • via James Ross from Journal of Ecology blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 5 days ago
    Cathy Pfister (University of Chicago) has recently had a paper published on kelp forests in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. She tells us more about her paper below… In the decade or so before WWI, Germany had a near monopoly on an essential resource: potash mines that supplied fertilizer (as well as gunpowder) globally. The possibility… Read the full article.
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 5 days ago

     

    The study, which focuses on fisheries’ productivity under progressive coral reef degradation, has also found that fisheries may be fairly robust up until the initial reef degradation stages.

    However, authorities needed to change management practices to take advantage of those benefits, UQ postdoctoral research fellow Dr Alice Rogers said.

    Dr Rogers, of UQ’s Marine Spatial Ecology Lab in the School of Biological Sciences, said coral reef health around the world was deteriorating, affecting the lives of tens of millions of people.
    “The loss of living corals alters the flora and fauna found in the sea,” she said.

    “This means less refuges and places to hide for reef fish – but it also means more algae, and more invertebrates that many reef fish eat.

    “Our study used a size-based food web model of a coral reef to explore how these changes affect coral reef communities, food webs and the potential productivity of coral reef fisheries...

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  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 5 days ago

    Lurking on Twitter and ecoevojobs.net, I sometimes see graduate students and postdocs feeling apologetic and even guilty about asking people for lots of reference letters. They worry that they’re asking for a big favor, which will burden their current and former supervisors with a ton of unwanted extra work. And I can see where they’re coming from. Nobody likes making extra work for other people, or asking too many favors of other people.

    But speaking for myself, and for every PI I’ve spoken to about this (which obviously isn’t a census or random sample of all PIs, but isn’t a tiny sample either), let me reassure you that you don’t need to worry about this. Your request for a reference letter is not a burden, and fulfilling it is not a huge favor. It’s part of my job to write reference letters for my current and former mentees. As many letters as they want, forever. Further, I’m happy to do it, because I want my current and...

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