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EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via sleather2012 from Don't Forget the Roundabouts
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 weeks ago

    A galling experience – what on earth is an aphid-induced phytotoxemia?

    Scientists, actually let me correct that, all members of specialist groups, be they plumbers or astrophysicists, love their jargon.  Insect-induced phytotoxemias is a great example. What entomologists and plant physiologists mean by this term is plant damage caused by an insect.  The visible damage that insects can cause to plants ranges from discolouration, lesions, and malformation of stems and leaves. As the title of this post suggests I am going to discuss galls.  Many insects produce galls, some of which can be spectacular such as Robin’s pin cushion gall caused by the wasp, Diplolepis rosae, but being a staunch aphidologist I am going to concentrate on various leaf deformities caused by aphids.

    ...

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  • via Joe Drake from The Secret Life of a Field Biologist
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 4 weeks ago
      This is: The water voles (Arvicola amphibius) are a large, semi-aquatic rodent in the UK.  Scottish water voles have a slightly darker coat than their English counterparts, which may be explained by a different genetic background migrating to the … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Chris Grieves from methods.blog (Methods in Ecology and Evolution)
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 9 hours ago
    We coined the term “soft sweeps” in 2005. The term has since become widely used, though not everyone uses the term in the same way. As part of the ‘How to Measure Natural Selection‘ Special Feature in Methods in Ecology … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via noreply@blogger.com (David Steen) from Living Alongside Wildlife
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 1 day ago
    Hi, I just found this guy in a shrub, 4-5 ft. off the ground, in my front yard in Macon, GA. Looks to me like he just had a good sized meal. I'm guessing he's maybe 24" stretched out. My best guess is rat or mole snake. If so, I'm glad to have him! I'd like to know if you can identify for certain. Thanks Kathy W. Georgia I live in southeastern PA and tonight found this
  • via Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 1 day ago

    Not many links this week! Just two: most Americans support increased funding for research once they realize how little we spend on it, and an upcoming one day celebration of science and scientists.

    From Meghan:

    Good news for scientists: Most Americans support increased funding for research once they realize how little of the US budget goes to research and development. Bethany Brookshire (a.k.a. Scicurious) wrote a summary of a study that was done in 2014. She writes:

    When participants received no information about how much the United States spent on research, only about 40 percent of them supported more funding. But when they were confronted with the real numbers, support for more funding leapt from 40 to 60...

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  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
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    3 months 1 day ago
    Seeing majestic lions strolling along the Maasai Mara at sunset — a dream vision for many conservationists, but a nightmare for pastoralists trying to keep their cattle safe at night. Fortunately a conservation success story from Kenya, published today in the journal Conservation Evidence, shows that predation of cattle can be reduced by almost 75% […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Benjamin Blonder from Natural Curiosities
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 1 day ago
  • via dinoverm from Parasite Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 1 day ago
    EEID 2017 starts this weekend, and I hope to see y’all there! As I always do, I’ll be conducting an unofficial parasite ecology cartoon contest when I watch talks – mostly for my own enjoyment, but also so that I … Continue reading → Read the full article.
  • via Sophia Winkler-Schor from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 2 days ago

    Hiking the Edwards-Hawdon Route in Arthur’s Pass National Park a few weeks ago, I had my first encounter with the majestic, yet devious, kea (Nestor notabilis). While stopping to catch my breath, a curious kea hopped over to greet me. I was thrilled to see this beautiful bird for the first time; I admired its verdant, olive coloring and laughed at its inquisitive gesticulations. After taking a 100 (mostly blurry) pictures, I continued on my hike. Little did I know I would meet the kea again.

    After living off nuts and fruit for two days, I looked forward to a piping-hot basket of salty fries at Arthur’s Pass Cafe. As a US-native, I knew nothing of the kea’s notorious nature, nor that they terrorize tourists throughout the South Island, particularly...

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  • via Stephanie Schuttler from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    3 months 2 days ago

    Conservationists and other nature lovers frequently advocate to save or increase biodiversity, but what exactly is biodiversity? One conjures up images of rainforests, coral reefs or animal clipart arranged artistically. These hint at the concept of biodiversity, which on the surface, seems simple, but gets more complicated once you try to measure it (even for scientists).

    Biodiversity describes the variety of life forms and should be tied to a specific area (e.g. a site, ecosystem, or region). In most cases, species are used as “life forms,” which is why we frequently see these animal assemblages or rainforest images to accompany the word biodiversity because more species = higher biodiversity. As a fancy scientist, one of my favorite things is...

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