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EcoBloggers


EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 6 days ago
    Restoration of lost habitats and ecosystems hits all the right notes — conservation optimism, a can-do attitude, and the excitement of seeing biologically impoverished areas teem with life once more. The Strategic Plan of the Convention on Biological Diversity includes a target to restore at least 15% of degraded ecosystems. This is being enthusiastically taken […] ... Read the full article.
  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 6 days ago
    Sometimes, I get cited incorrectly. I have some feelings about this.
  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
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    2 months 1 week ago

    According to a text mining analysis of the papers ecologists publish, the number of p-values per paper has increased about 10-fold from 1970 to 2010. Where 0 p-values was sufficient to get a paper published in 1930, about 1 p-value per paper was expected to be published in 1970, and now about 10 p-values per paper are needed in the 2010s (Low-Decarie et al 2014 Figure 2). Our science must now be at least 10 times as rigorous! The only thing in the way of the p-value juggernaut is AIC which has been gaining at the expense of slowing down p-value growth. I’ve already shared my opinions that AIC is appealing to ecologists for some not so good reasons. Here I want to argue that we have gotten into some pretty sloppy thinking about p-values a well.

    I would characterize the modern approach to p-...

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  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 1 week ago
    http://www.lincolnecology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Ecolincnz-podcast5-2.m4a

    Adrian talks to Dr Manjula Kularathna who has just stared at a lecturer at Lincoln University. Manjula is passionate about nematodes and cricket. Manjula is particularly interested in nematodes that affect crops and has worked extensively on nematodes in soy and maize crops. New Zealand has been lacking any researcher in this vital area for the last couple of decades and we are even unsure as to just how much of a problem (and crop...

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  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
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    2 months 1 week ago
    This is wonderful: NSF is now requiring awardee institutions to report findings of sexual harassment by personnel on NSF grants, and to report when individuals are placed on leave related to an investigation. And they are prepared to take serious measures in response. Here’s the NSF statement, and related stories published by Nature and The New Republic.… Read the full article.
  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
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    2 months 1 week ago

    Academics generate a lot of intellectual property (IP for short). Arguably it is the main thing we do aside from teaching. And the IP landscape is changing rapidly both in and out of academia. This is yet-another-thing academics are supposed to be excellent at without any formal training. I don’t have extensive training, but I spent 10 years working in the software world and often was the lead business person working with lawyers to negotiate software contracts. So I have thought about these topics and how they are evolving. They seem to be evolving in some directions that don’t make sense to me. So I thought I would write a brief guide to the issues and raise some of the concerns I have.

    NB: I am not a lawyer and have no formal training. Anybody who has questions of real consequences should consult a professional. I take no responsibility for people who substitute my opinions in this blog in lieu of professional advice.

    Broadly...

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  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 weeks ago

    Veronica Price-Jones was an international exchange student that came to Lincoln University in 2017. She did the ECOL 393 Field Ecology Research course and recounts her experiences here.

    Admittedly, my ECOL393 experience did not get off to the most auspicious start. Thanks to a combination of cancelled, delayed and missed flights, I arrived in the country on the first day of my field tour, without my luggage. Luckily, the teaching staff were very accommodating: they were able to pick me up directly from the airport and make a brief stop at a local department store to pick up a few extra supplies. From there, things could only improve, right?

    ... Read the full article.
  • via Alex Bond from The Lab and Field
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    2 months 2 weeks ago

    If you’ve been involved in research for more than a couple of years, chances are you quite quickly start to accumulate a list, even if only in your mind, of Things It Would Be Neat To Do. These could be things that you identify as gaps while pursuing your main research theme, or ideas that spark out of a paper you happened to leaf through while waiting for a meeting to start.

    And typically starting around the later years of a PhD, and through postdocs and early career positions, the flood of ideas for things to do keeps, well, flooding. You see gaps, methods that need improving, sites that need investigating, and questions that need answering. And very quickly you realize that you do not have time to do it all.

    And so it begins: the search for minions!

    Or rather, students, collaborators, or others upon whom you can foist your ideas, your existing data, your passion, in the hopes that they will take the torch and run. At some stage, the list becomes too...

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  • via Terry McGlynn from Small Pond Science
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    2 months 2 weeks ago
    The term “passing the trash” is commonly used to describe when sexually abusive K-12 teachers and priests get quietly shifted to new schools and parishes, where they assault more people. We also use this term in higher ed, when professors who commit sexual misconduct are allowed to slink out of their universities with the approving… Read the full article.
  • via jeffollerton from Jeff Ollerton
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    2 months 2 weeks ago

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