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EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • via WildlifeSNPits from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Oyster Adaptation to Ocean Acidification
    Oceans are a large carbon sink, and one of the effects of climate change is that the oceans are becoming more acidic (see here for a description of how this happens).  This changing environment presents a problem for marine species that must acclimate or adapt to living in a more acidic environment, particularly given how important pH is for maintaining bodily functions.  This paper (sub) investigated gene regulation in Sydney Rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) by experimentally manipulating water pH for oysters in the lab.  They found over 2900 genes differentially expressed between regular and elevated water CO2 levels.  One of several interesting findings was that immune and stress response genes...

    Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Also this week: plants vs. jazz, National Geographic photos of the year, economist vs. sophisticated statistics, RIP sole-authored papers, and more.

    From Jeremy:

    Barlow et al. (2017) quantify the decline in sole-authored papers at the Journal of Applied Ecology. They also report that, over the last decade, multi-authored papers are 2.5x more likely to be accepted for publication than sole-authored papers, and are cited more often (though the citation effect is so small and noisy that I doubt it’s real, or worth worrying about even if it is). I suspect that’s at least in part because sole authorship covaries with other variables that predict paper quality and fit to the journal. But perhaps I’m wrong about that; Barlow et al. speculate on various reasons why multi-authored papers might be better on average than sole-...

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  • via James_Borrell from James Borrell
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    This article is part of series commissioned and published by Tentsile. It follows our overland journey across Southern Africa in search of inspiring and positive conservation stories. You can read the original article on the Tentsile blog, or catch up on the whole series.

    A long way from anywhere

    We nearly skipped Mozambique altogether. If driving a Landcruiser...

    Read the full article.
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    Previous research on wild dolphins in Australia and wild bears in North America has revealed that reproductive success is the best predictor of the viability of these long-lived populations, rather than their survival rates.

    The findings of these and other studies fly in the face of decades of population modelling, which has led to a widespread generalisation that survival is the most important factor for population viability of long-lived species, the researchers say.

    “Our analysis suggests that conservation planners are often getting it wrong,” says first author and UNSW scientist Dr Oliver Manlik.

    “We believe our research will set a new course for wildlife biologists who are trying to minimize extinction. It shows them how to identify whether to focus on alleviating threats to reproduction, or to survival,” he says.

    The review article, ‘Applicability and limitations of sensitivity analyses for wildlife management’, by Dr...

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  • via Brian McGill from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Note from Brian: This is a guest post from Catherine Hulshof, a professor in Puerto Rico. A while back we had an ask us anything question on perceptions of ecology coming out of developing countries followed by several first person accounts. Catherine had a very different perspective from anything we’ve heard so far on the topic that I thought was important to express. She has a blog here.

    There are two perspectives of science in developing countries. The first perspective provides examples of scientists who ‘did science correctly’ to demonstrate that these regions contribute to global knowledge. The...

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  • via Manu Saunders from Ecology is Not a Dirty Word
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    The number of authors included on research papers in many disciplines has increased over time. This editorial in Journal of Applied Ecology is the latest analysis of this trend, finding that published single-author research papers in that journal have declined… Read the full article.
  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    Aiding the conservation of big cats and their prey in Mexican tropical forests

    Ecologists from the University of Southampton (UK) and Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (Mexico) have been studying the presence and distribution of the elusive jaguar and puma in three contiguous regions of protected and unprotected forest in Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula.

    Camera traps and analysis of faeces revealed that jaguars and pumas prefer to prey on peccaries, deer and coati – species that are regularly hunted by local communities for their wild meat.

    “Rural communities living near these nature reserves manage the natural resources in their communal lands, known as ejidos. Subsistence hunting of game meat and logging by residents is permitted in the ejidos, but there are no effective measures in place to regulate the hunting pressure”, says Evelyn Piña Covarrubias from the University of Southampton.

    “Habitat fragmentation due to increased...

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  • via noreply@blogger.com (Caroline Tucker) from The EEB & Flow
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    It seems that ecologists have been complaining that no one writes single author manuscripts anymore since at least the 1960s. de Solla Price predicted in 1963:
    "…the proportion of multi-author papers has accelerated steadily and powerfully, and it is now so large that if it continues at the present rate, by 1980 the single-author paper will be extinct”Fortunately, an interesting new editorial in the Journal of Applied Ecology has the data (from their archives of published and submitted papers) to evaluate to ask whether this disastrous outcome has actually occurred.

    It turns out that Price was wrong about single-author extinction, although he hadn't misread the trends. Since the 1970s, the proportion of single-authored papers at the journal have declined to less than 4% and the mean number of authors has risen to more than 5 (Figure 1).

    ... Read the full article.
  • via freshwaterblog from The BioFresh blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    RIMG1758

    Dr Andrea Funk on an ecological survey of the Danube River. Image: Andrea Funk

    This week we continue our series of interviews with researchers from the AQUACROSS project. AQUACROSS is an EU-funded project which seeks to advance the application of ecosystem-based management for aquatic ecosystems, to help support the EU 2020 Biodiversity Strategy and other international conservation targets.

    Dr Andrea Funk is an expert in wetland ecology, with a special focus on  biodiversity, and the restoration and conservation of...

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  • via Adrian Paterson from EcoLincNZ
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    http://www.lincolnecology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/ecolincnz-podcast2.m4a

    Dr Jon Sullivan has been interested in interactions all of his life. Increasingly he has become more passionate about monitoring and surveillance of biodiversity of both introduced and native varieties. Adrian talks with him about how he got into ecology, discovering insect species in Costa Rica, wild kiwifruit, understanding weedy plant species, working with the public to monitor species especially with NatureWatch, myrtle rust and helping people get a sense of guardianship for the land.

    ... Read the full article.

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