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EcoBloggers is a feed of ecology blogs aggregated from around the web. If you write an Ecology blog (made up primarily of original posts by you or contributors), and you'd like to have it included here, email the feed link to the site webmaster. Each contributed post is trimmed to stay on the right side of copyright law and to encourage readers to click through to contributors' sites. You can get the RSS feed here. Each post is also automatically tweeted by @EcoBloggers.
  • from Next Succession
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago


    "We're going to reforest the world," Brian exclaimed, minutes after I arrived at his home slash farm, nursery, education center and reforestation site.  Bosque Village, meaning 'Forest Village' in its official language of Spanglish, is also an experiment in "living happily and comfortably in a post fossil-fuel world."  Since founding Bosque Village in 2004, Brian's has been proving that humans can coexist with forests.  From his wealth of experience I've complied Brian's "Three Principles for Reforesting the World."
    ... Read the full article.
  • via Stephanie Schuttler from WildlifeSNPits
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    I love fashion, especially garments with animals on them. I wear so many of them, that my boss asked me about the biodiversity of my closet. I was genuinely curious so I counted all the plants, animals, and any other life forms that I could spot and calculated the Shannon Weiner Index, a real index used in scientific research, of the biodiversity within my wardrobe. I ended up having a seemingly diverse wardrobe with a value of 4.1, but was this really that diverse? I blogged about it and set out a call to action to find out.

    It turns out, that I remain the queen of biodiverse wardrobes. My index was the highest, but fellow blogger Emily Puckett’s was a close second with 3.9…

    ...

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  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    Rising numbers of wild boar have been linked to higher crop damage, disease transmissions and car accidents in many European countries. In Flanders, wild boars have been absent for almost 50 years and only returned in 2006. Estimates from hunting bags show a growing population which is still expanding its range, from the eastern province of Limburg towards the more central provinces of Antwerp and Vlaams-Brabant.

    Landscape structures in Flanders changed in the years of absence of wild boar, resulting in a dense, mosaic-like pattern of agricultural, natural and urban areas. Thus, there have been many human-wildlife conflicts since.

    “I want to get a first insight into the extent of agricultural damage by wild boar because, in contrast to neighbouring regions and countries, this has not been monitored in the past and it is not known how high the financial damages are for this sector”, Anneleen Rutten says.

    The method was developed to be affordable and easy to...

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  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    PhD student Ramona Heim from Professor Norbert Hölzel’s working group at the Institute of Landscape Ecology, University of Münster, compared two study sites in northeastern Russia, where the last fires occurred 11 and more than 30 years ago. At the younger site, soil temperature and permafrost depth were significantly higher and lichen cover was much reduced. In contrast, moss, grass and herb species were more abundant compared to control sites nearby.

    “Soil temperature at our older study site is no longer impacted by the fire, but even 30-odd years after the fire event, lichens have not completely recovered”, says Ramona Heim. “The dense cover of shrubs was a surprise. Usually, fires prevent the formation of dense shrub layers, but these results suggest that tundra fires could promote it instead”, she adds.

    The change in vegetation structure has important long-term consequences for plant communities, microclimates and animals depending on certain plants...

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  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    From red foxes, roe deer and badgers to rabbits and grey squirrels, the team has amassed over 160,000 volunteer-captured wildlife images to date, providing valuable information on the diversity and distribution of mammals, many of which are nocturnal.

    Mammal Web is a citizen science platform led by Durham Wildlife Trust and ecologists from Durham University, and supported by the British Ecological Society, which was launched in northeast England in 2015 and has since had photo contributions from volunteers in Scotland, Sussex and Oxfordshire.

    Citizens even provided data leading to the capture of a non-native invasive species in Sunderland and that helped inform plans for a Local Nature Reserve in County Durham. Informing and influencing local conservation policies is a key part of this large-scale study.

    Project co-leader Pen-Yuan Hsing from Durham University says: “Mammals can be very elusive. They often come out at...

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  • via Sabrina Weiss from BES Ecology and Policy Blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

     

    The researchers combined images from two specialised sensors mounted in airplanes to evaluate the density and colour of leaves on individual trees in the city of Brussels. First, they used LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data to detect and delineate individual trees. LiDAR data consists of very accurate distance measurements between the airplane and objects on the ground, generating a detailed 3D representation of the city.

    Secondly, they employed hyperspectral data to determine the density and health of the trees’ leaves. ‘Hyperspectral’ means that the wavelength pattern of light reflected from objects is measured in very high resolution. Each object reflects different parts of the light’s spectrum depending on its properties like colour, chemical components and structure. As trees suffering from a disease or environmental stress become less green and have less leaves (showing more of the surface below), this data allows to distinguish healthy from...

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  • via CJAB from Conservation Bytes
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    Saving primates is a complicated business. Primates are intelligent, social animals that have complex needs. They come into conflict with humans when they raid rubbish bins and crops, chew power cables, and in some cases become aggressive towards people. Humans, however, have the upper hand. While 60% of non-human primate species are threatened, humans grow […] ... Read the full article.
  • from Next Succession
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    laguna de yuriria lake conservation reforestation ecosystem guanajuato mexico

    Yuriria Lake is a 'novel' ecosystem, meaning man-made.[1]  The Spanish created the lake in 1548 by diverting the Lerma River to fill former swamplands--their first hydrological project in the New World.  The resulting water source exuded colonial power; around it the Spanish built forts and resettled natives.  Today, 1,500 families depend on its waters for industries like fishing, tourism and agriculture.[2]  Its ecological... Read the full article.
  • via Journal of Applied Ecology from The Applied Ecologist's blog
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago
    The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:1 is written by Associate Editor, Paul Kardol. The article chosen is Integrating local knowledge and research to refine the management of an invasive non-native grass in critically endangered grassy woodlands by Firn et al. Elucidating patterns of species invasions and the underlying mechanisms are key challenges for present-day ecologists. They […] Read the full article.
  • via Jeremy Fox from Dynamic Ecology
    Citation for this post: BibTeX | RIS
    1 month 1 week ago

    The American Society of Naturalists invites applications for the Jasper Loftus-Hills Young Investigators Award. This year I have the honor of chairing the ASN YIA committee, along with Luke Harmon, Janneke Hille Ris Lambers, and Renee Duckworth. I think it’s great that ASN honors not just one but four outstanding young investigators from across ecology, evolution, behavior, and genetics.

    This year I hope we’ll see more applications from ecologists; ecology has been underrepresented in the applicant pool in recent years.

    Awardees get to speak in a dedicated YIA symposium at the next ASN meeting, $500 USD, free registration for the meeting, and...

    Read the full article.

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